News Sentiment with ML/AI – Part 3

This is part 3 on evaluating news sentiment using ML/AI. Here is part 1 and part 2.

Recap

Previously on part 2 of this news analysis series, Google Cloud Natural Language was able to detect the emotional level and its sentiment. We looked at a CNBC article reviewing the iPhone and it is an emotional piece.

Let’s look at more articles and its analyses.

CNBC With Higest Positive Score

The CNBC news article with the highest positive score is titled: Victoria Beckham on juggling a fashion brand with family life: ‘I just do the best I can’.

It has a score of 0.4 with a magnitude of 6.4. The average score for all CNBC articles are -0.051443570457 with a magnitude of 5.6818897663138.

The article’s tone is positive as it presents hope for working women with a family. Here are some quotes:

When you’re a working mum, you feel torn, you feel guilty, but I just do the best that I can do. My kids and (soccer star husband) David will always come first.

that’s why we need to support each other, first and foremost.”

“I’m doing the best I can creatively, as a wife, as a mum

CNBC With Lowest Positive Score

The CNBC news article with the lowest score is titled: Mattis relationship with Trump reportedly frays as a decision on his fate looms, but White House dismisses.

It has a score of -0.699999988079071 with a magnitude of 2.0999999046325684. The average score for all CNBC articles are -0.051443570457 with a magnitude of 5.6818897663138.

The score is negative which means that is correlated to negative emotion. The article describes President Trump’s soured relationship with Secretary of Defense James Mattis. Here are are some quotes:

The relationship between President Donald Trump and Secretary of Defense James Mattis may have “soured” to the point of no return

Trump is … resentful of unflattering comparisons between the two men, the publication reported.

…the president is reportedly looking to replace the four star general…

NYTimes With Highest Positive Score

This NYTimes article has the highest score: 20 Wines Under $20: When Any Night Can Be a Weeknight.

It has a score of 0.4 with a whopping magnitude of 63.70000076293945. The average score for all NYTimes articles are -0.03707533304 with a magnitude of 18.0847858237.

The article is slightly positive but does have a high magnitude of 63.7. After reading through parts of the article, it is written with expressive and descriptive words. Here are some quotes:

Greatness in a wine is not solely a measure of complexity or profundity.

…represents a people and a culture and a love of wine, then a few extra dollars is a worthwhile investment.

But good ones, like this wine from La Staffa, grown in the Castelli di Jesi region in the northern Marche near the Adriatic, reawaken curiosity.

NYTimes With Lowest Score

This NYTimes article has the lowest score: Myanmar’s ‘Gravest Crimes’ Against Rohingya Demand Action, U.N. Says.

It has a score of -0.5 with a magnitude of 10.69999980926514. The average score for all NYTimes articles are -0.03707533304 with a magnitude of 18.0847858237.

The article is slightly negative as it details Myanmar army’s crime against a muslim minority group in Rakhine. It is written in a somber tone about a grave injustice. Here are some quotes:

…“the gravest crimes under international law”…

…troops shot some of the children and snatched infants from their mothers, throwing some into the river to drown while tossing others onto a fire, …

“The killing of civilians of all ages, including babies, cannot be argued to be a counterterrorism measure…“

Conclusion

After looking at both articles from CNBC and NYTimes, I am further impressed by Google’s ability to determine human expression. CNBC has an average magnitude of 5.68 compared to NYTimes 18.08. CNBC uses more common words whereas NYTimes’ articles are written with expressive and descriptive words. It is fascinating that an algorithm can make that distinction.

Articles from both sites are written fairly neutral. Depending on the content, some are slightly positive while others are slightly negative. I do not see exaggeration from both sides.